A Handy List of Where to Submit Your Work for Awards

One of the challenges of self-publishing is that you need to be your own marketing department. You have to share the fact that your book is out in the world, and that includes letting awards committees know about it too!

It can be daunting to submit your own work for an award. I’ll admit, when I first got into self-publishing, I thought submitting my own work wasn’t sacrosanct. I thought that juries combed through books, selected their favorites, and made a ballot. Self-promotion for an award was rude and uncouth. I have since learned otherwise, and I’m glad I did.

Now, some awards juries don’t accept unsolicited submissions — but many others do! And further, they say specifically that you can submit as the author of the piece! So go on — submit that work! What’ve you got to lose?

But Sonora, where do I start? That’s where the list below comes in. I’m starting a living blog post — one I’ll keep updated beyond the initial posting — with links to awards that allow you to submit your own work. Please let me know if you know of any awards that aren’t listed, and I’ll add them as well.

Happy submitting, and good luck!


 

Literary Awards You Can Submit Your Own Work To (last updated: Dec. 3, 2019)

Charity Anthology: Give to “Horror for RAICES” and Receive a Free ebook!

horror for raices

In response to the horrific conditions for asylum-seekers, refugees, and immigrants at the U.S. southern border, Nightscape Press is releasing an anthology called “Horror for RAICES: A Charitable Anthology.”

From the anthology’s GoFundMe page:

Nightscape Press is putting together an emergency charitable anthology for RAICES called Horror For RAICES. RAICES is a major player in the fight for immigrant and refugee rights in the United States.

Horror For RAICES will be edited by Jennifer Wilson and Robert S. Wilson and all net proceeds from the book will go to RAICES. If you donate $10 or more via this fundraiser, you will get an advance uncorrected eBook copy of the book as soon as it’s ready.

Our aim for this publication is to have the ebook officially available by August, 2019 with the trade paperback edition coming shortly thereafter.

Our aim for this GoFundMe is to raise at least our goal before the official release. Please help spread the word!

Horror For RAICES will include stories by Paul Tremblay, Laird Barron, Ramsey Campbell, Christopher Slatsky, Paul Michael Anderson, and more fantastic authors still yet to be announced.

I hope you will consider making a donation for this excellent cause. And, you’ll get an advance ebook copy for any donation of $10 or more – a bargain for the good this anthology aims to do.

Please also share the fundraiser with your family and friends.

Thank you!

Ask the Author: A Q&A with Steven R. Southard

Steven Southard
“I write because I have to, because I’m driven to, because some inner urge compels me.”

Quoth the Raven, an anthology of stories and poems with a contemporary twist on the works of Edgar Allan Poe, features 30 different authors (including yours truly). I spoke with fellow contributor Steven R. Southard, and you can see our conversation below. Read on for what inspires Steven, what it’s like to write both horror and science fiction, and more.

Bio: Having spent time near Baltimore, it’s possible that author Steven R. Southard has somehow absorbed a measure of the still-lingering aura of Edgar Allan Poe. During the night’s darkest hours, by the light of a single candle, Steve pens tales of fantasy, science fiction, horror, and alternate history. His stories appear in more than ten anthologies and one series. The bravest and most curious among you may venture to his website at stevenrsouthard.com, where you may discover Steve waiting, lurking, and well hidden behind his codename: Poseidon’s Scribe.


How did you come up with the name “Poseidon’s Scribe”?

My name is Steven R. Southard. Poseidon’s Scribe is just my job. Since so many people ask, I’ve written a FAQ post about the job. In case you’re wondering, Poseidon is generally happy with my work and the sea god only needs one scribe, so you need not apply

How long have you been writing?

Two answers—thirty years and fifteen years. Thirty years ago, I figured I could jot down a best-selling novel in no time, with no study. I then wasted fifteen years and ended up with an unpublishable manuscript. Fifteen years ago, I got serious about my writing, shifted to short stories and began actually submitting them. And getting published!

What are some of the things you’ve learned as an author?

I learned that I write because I have to, because I’m driven to, because some inner urge compels me. Early on, I thought I was writing to be famous, well-read, and rich, but I was wrong about that.

I’ve also learned which aspects of writing come easily to me and which ones I struggle with.

I’ve learned writing is easy, getting published is hard, and making a decent living from writing is next to impossible.

I’ve learned that books about writing are full of stern advice, but if the advice feels wrong for you, follow your instincts.

Who are some of your favorite writers? What are some of your favorite books?

Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Robert A. Heinlein’s Time Enough for Love, Isaac Asimov’s The Gods Themselves, Arthur C. Clarke’s The Deep Range, Ray Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles, and Larry Niven’s Ringworld.

What advice would you give to aspiring writers?

Study the craft a bit, but write a lot. As you write, don’t be afraid to experiment, to dabble, to reach deep, to explore, and to play at writing.

Follow Heinlein’s Rules for Writers. Follow them for every story you write.

Seek the help that helps you most. For me, that’s a critique group. For you, it might be books about writing, writing classes, writing conferences, who knows what?

I see you write both horror and science fiction. What drew you to each? Do you feel more inspired by one genre versus the other? What similarities have you found between writing both? What key differences have you found between them when writing both?

True, I’ve written both. SF because I like it, but horror only if an anthology wants it and my muse is interested. I write far more SF, and its various offshoots like alternate history and especially steampunk. As a former engineer, I’m attracted to stories featuring technology. Think of SF and horror as two overlapping circles in a Venn diagram. SF is about solving problems through technology or science. Horror is about making readers feel fear. Some stories, of course, are both.

What non-literary things inspire you?

I find inspiration everywhere. I’ve written stories based on a Mythbuster episode, caring for an aging relative, historical technologies and legends, a Thanksgiving dinner discussion, and other improbable sources. We live in a world ideally suited to inspire writers; perhaps that’s its purpose.

What is your favorite Edgar Allan Poe story, and why? If you can’t pick one, what are a few of your favorites and why?

So many, so many … I love the tight and complex rhyming schemes of the poems “The Raven” and “Annabel Lee.” I love the precise and scientific nature of his prose in “A Descent into the Maelström” and “The Murders in the Rue Morgue.”

Tell us more about “The Unparalleled Attempt to Rescue One Hans Pfaall,” your story for “Quoth the Raven.” What made you choose “The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaall” as the story to reimagine? What contemporary inspirations did you draw from to write the story?

I found a book of Poe’s stories and poems at my parents-in-law’s house, and the book contained the Hans Pfaall tale. It’s Poe at his most whimsical, as if he’d somehow teamed up with Dr. Seuss. It’s one of his lesser known works because it leaves too many loose ends and differs from his later writing.

At a time when hot air balloons were new, Poe captivated readers with a story of a journey to the Moon by balloon. Knowing that some readers might actually believe it, Poe kept the story light-hearted and farcical in tone (the balloon’s gas-bag is made from newspapers!). He intended to continue the story in subsequent installments and never did.

The story begged for a sequel that ties up the loose ends, so I wrote one.

Do you have any upcoming projects you’d like to share with us?

I’m writing the second in a planned series of alternate history stories about Brother Eilmer of Malmesbury Abbey. He’s a medieval Benedictine monk who creates technological inventions far in advance of his time. My first such story was “Instability,” which appeared in the anthology Dark Luminous Wings, and was based on an actual recorded event.


You can find Steven’s books on Amazon.

Connect with Steven on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Check out Steven’s interview with me on his blog!

Out Now: “Quoth the Raven”

Today is the 169th anniversary of the death of Edgar Allan Poe. To honor one of horror’s earliest masters, Camden Park Press has put together an anthology called Quoth the Raven. The anthology collects 30 stories and poems that put a contemporary twist on Poe’s works. My story, “Hearts are Just ‘Likes,'” is one of the 30 included.

The anthology is out today! Pick up a copy here.

Quoth the Raven
From Camden Park Press

The works of Poe were dark and often disturbing.From dismembered corpses, rivals bricked behind cellar walls, murders in back alleys, laments for lost loves, obsessions that drive men — and women! — to madness, his stories have had a profound impact on both the horror and mystery genres to this day.

In Quoth the Raven, we invite you to answer the call of the raven and revisit Poe’s work, re-imagined for the twenty-first century. Here, the lover of mystery and Gothic horror will find familiar themes in contemporary settings, variations on Poe’s tales, and faithful recreations of the author’s signature style.

Contains stories and poems by Aryan Bollinger, Brian Ellis, Chris Abela, Donea Lee Weaver, Edward Ahern, Emerian Rich, Frank Coffman, Gregory J. Wolos, Hugh J.O’Donnell, John Kiste, Kara Race-Moore, Karen Robiscoe, Kenneth C. Goldman, Lauryn Christopher, Lawrence Berry, Matthew M. Montelione, Melanie Cossey, Penelope Paling, R.C. Scandalis, Sarah Murtagh, Scott Wheelock, Sidney Williams, Sonora Taylor, Stephanie L. Harper, Steven R. Southard, Susan McCauley, Tiffany Michelle Brown, Tonia Kalouria, and Vicki Weisfeld.

The anthology is available in ebook and paperback. Order yours today — and after you’ve read it, be sure to leave a review!

Thanks for reading.

Two (!) New Releases Next Week

Happy October, everyone! The second week is a busy one on my end, but in an awesome way. I’ll have two books — one a collection of my own, and one an anthology I’m included in — available to purchase next week.

The first is the anthology: Quoth the Raven, a collection of contemporary re-imaginings of the works of Edgar Allan Poe, from Camden Park Press. My story, “Hearts are Just ‘Likes,'” is one of many stories and poems to appear in the collection, which is edited by Lyn Worthen. It’s a modern take on “The Tell-Tale Heart,” one of my favorite Poe stories. The anthology is available for pre-order now, and will be available on October 7, 2018.

quoth the raven
From Camden Park Press

Pre-order Quoth the Raven: Kindle | Paperback (Amazon)
Nook | Other ebook outlets

The second is my next short story collection, Wither and Other Stories. It will feature four new stories: “Wither,” “Nesting,” “Smoke Circles,” and “We Really Shouldn’t.” It will be available in ebook and paperback on October 9, 2018.

wither and other stories
Cover Art by Doug Puller.

Read more about “Wither and Other Stories.”

I hope you enjoy these stories. Both books will be excellent, fast reads for the Halloween season.

I also have a few other projects in the works, which I’ll share more about in the coming weeks.

Accepted!

This past weekend, I received my first acceptance letter! *throws all the confetti*

confetti corgi

Camden Park Press is releasing an anthology called “Quoth the Raven.” It will feature stories and poems that put a modern twist on the works of Edgar Allan Poe. I adore Poe’s work (more on that further below), and decided to write a story and try my luck. I’m happy and proud to say that my story was chosen for the anthology! My story, “Hearts are Just ‘Likes’,” moves “The Tell-Tale Heart” to social media. It was fun to write, and I can’t wait for all of you to read it as part of this awesome collection.

While I’ve self-published my last two books, I’ve been submitting short stories to contests and calls for submission from various journals, magazines, and anthologies. I started a rejection collection to collect my rejection letters. When I created it, I held out hope that one day, I’d start an acceptance collection. I officially started one today.

img_6383

I chose a picture of Ina Garten because I admire her — I try to follow Roxane Gay’s credo, quoted on the binder cover, in my own day-to-day — and because when I found the picture of her cookbook, How Easy is That?, I smirked at how she’ll often say that even after preparing something that’s kind of complicated. I thought more deeply about this — as I do — and thought about how cooking seems easy when you’ve done it for years and when you’re seeing the finished product. It can be easy to forget all the ingredients and prep that went into an “easy” scone, just like it can be easy to forget all the failed scones that came before the successful one.

acceptance collection
I’m pretty excited.

While I don’t consider one acceptance letter to be the perfect scone, I chose that Ina photo because I wanted to remind myself that it took many steps — and many falls — to get to acceptance. It can be easy to forget that it wasn’t easy, that there were drafts and unfinished stories and rejected stories before the first (and hopefully not the last) acceptance came through. I added that picture to help me remember.

ina garten
This picture was a close second.

I am especially thrilled that my first acceptance was to a Poe-themed anthology. I started reading Poe’s work when I was eleven years old. I did a dramatic reading of the ending of “The Cask of Amontillado” for a sixth grade project (and I, for one, think I was robbed of being selected to go to a district competition, as I put my all into Fortunato’s pleading at the end), and scared myself awake by reading “Hop Frog” right before bed. My friends and I also spent a Poe-themed day in Baltimore two years ago. We visited his home as well as his grave site. We also had a drink at The Horse You Came In On Saloon, where Poe was last seen before his death.

poe's grave
Poe’s grave, located in Baltimore, Maryland.

I can’t wait to be a part of “Quoth the Raven,” and can’t wait to read all of the stories included in the anthology. The collection will be released October 7, 2018 — the 169th anniversary of Poe’s death. I’ll share more details as they become available on my Facebook page and my Twitter account.

the raven
During our visit to Poe’s house, one of my friends bought a raven puppet in the gift shop. The puppet made the selfie rounds all evening.