The Horror of Motherly Love

This Sunday, May 12, is Mother’s Day. Sadly, my mom lives several hours away in North Carolina; but we chat every Sunday and I always send her a gift (though it’ll be late this year — sorry Mom).

Ahead of the holiday, I found myself reflecting on how most of my love stories fall into two categories: romantic (however twisted it may be), or familial between a mother and her daughter. The titular stories in my two collections, “The Crow’s Gift” and “Wither,” both focus on relationships between the main female protagonist and her mother. “Wither” goes one step further and includes Mother Nature — and the destructive relationship that can occur between her and her children.

sharp objects
Left to right: Amma, Camille, and Adora from Sharp Objects.

Without Condition is my first story to examine both motherly love and romantic love. While the focus is largely on Cara and her boyfriend, my first inkling of the story was rooted in the relationship between Cara and her mother. It was her mother’s unconditional love for her, even in the face of horrendous activities, that helped me think of the rest of the plot (not to mention the title).

I once read a study that claimed the bond between a mother and her daughter is the strongest possible bond between any parent-child pairing. While I can’t say that for sure, there is certainly something special about the way a woman is bonded to her mother in ways we don’t see with her father, or don’t see between a mother and her son. It’s something special to witness when it’s good, and something terrify to witness when it’s broken or abusive.

Carrie touched on this perfectly. The terror doesn’t lie in Carrie’s powers, nor just in the way she’s bullied; but in the power and influence Margaret White has over her daughter. As evil and tormented as she is, you still see their bond and the fact that Mrs. White truly worries about her. I think of in the movie, when Carrie shatters the mirror; and Margaret stops playing the piano and says in her most normal, concerned voice, “Carrie?” She’s worried her daughter is hurt, even as she calls her sinful. It almost makes it all the scarier when Margaret comes for Carrie with a knife in the climax.

margaret white
Also, this scene is just creepy AF.

I also think that the TV show Riverdale has done an excellent exploration of mothers and daughters in the fraught connection between Betty and Alice. Season 3 has been a little uneven, but the show has quietly shown how hard it is for a daughter to sever a tie with her mother, and how that tie — even when dangerous — may be the least dangerous option she has. Alice has joined a cult called The Farm, a group that Betty wants no part of; even if it means losing a connection to her mom. Out of desperation, Betty turns to her jailed serial killer father instead of her cult-worshiping mother, but when her father is (purportedly) free, he comes for her and tries to kill her (this post was written on May 7, and it’s possible revelations in later episodes may dispute these facts, because that’s what Riverdale does and that’s one of the reasons I love it in all its messy glory). Betty gives in to her mother for safety, and she’s embraced. She may still be in danger, but she’s with her mother; and with her mother, the feeling of safety is stronger and perhaps more real. This could be to Betty’s advantage or her detriment — only time will tell.

A final story that delved into this in spectacularly creepy fashion is Sharp Objects (which I also wrote about when the HBO adaptation aired last summer). Here, you have three female bonds: mother, daughter, and sister; none of whom can abandon the other completely despite the misdeeds of each. It also shows the darker side of a mother’s desire to feel needed, and how her daughter will nearly die to fill that need.

Betty and Alice Cooper
Betty and Alice Cooper.

The bond between a mother and daughter can make for excellent dark fiction when done well. I’m less interested in “crazy mom/rebel daughter” narratives, and more the stories of daughters who can’t leave their mothers behind, or vice versa; despite their dark deeds. The bond is strong, even when it’s frayed — maybe even the strongest of all. But that isn’t always a good thing.

I hope that those of you with good bonds, though, have a wonderful Mother’s Day. And, I want to wish the happiest of Mother’s Days to my mom. Thanks for reading my work, supporting me, and being an all-around gem.

Happy Halloween!

Happy Halloween, boils and ghouls!

cryptkeeper

Halloween, along with Christmas, is my favorite holiday. I love how everything takes on an extra spooky feel, even beyond decorations and costumes. The trees are a little more crooked, the wind is a little bit more like a sigh, and the silence in the darkness is a little more thick.

While Halloween is the pinnacle of all things scary, I celebrate it all year long. A frequent exchange in my house is me suggesting a horror movie, and my husband saying, “It’s not October.” Yes, and?

My books follow the same pattern. My next novel, Without Condition, is scheduled for February 12, 2019. I’ve scheduled its release around another holiday: Valentine’s Day. It is a romance, after all — just my version of one.

I also have two short story collections that are great for any time of year, but extra good when read during late autumn’s chill. Check out The Crow’s Gift and Wither if you’re looking for some quick, scary reads today.

Have a great holiday, everyone!

Out Now: “Wither and Other Stories”

I’m proud to announce that “Wither and Other Stories” is now available!

wither and other stories
Cover Art by Doug Puller.

Should we or shouldn’t we? It’s a question many ask themselves each day. Should we or shouldn’t we wither in a wooded paradise instead of a broken city? Leave our home when the news warns us of what’s outside? Join in a circle of nighttime delights? Be with someone who awakens our sins?

“Wither and Other Stories” tells four tales of the choice to partake. In the end, the choice may not need to be made. For when we ask ourselves, “Should we or shouldn’t we,” the answer is always yes.

The collection features four brand new short stories: “Wither,” “Nesting,” “Smoke Circles,” and “We Really Shouldn’t.” It’s available in ebook and paperback.

Pick up your copy today — and once you’ve read it, please leave a review. I’d love to hear what you think!

Thanks for reading, everyone.

P.S. Be sure to also pick up a copy of Quoth the Raven — which features my Poe-inspired short story, “Hearts are Just ‘Likes'” — if you haven’t already!

October Reads: Time for (More) Darkness

It’s October, the time of year when most people dust off their horror novels and horror movies. I, for one, like engaging with dark fiction all year long. But I do feel an extra pull to the darker corners of literature in October. There’s a chill in the air and an excited energy to immerse oneself in the macabre, the shocking, and the unexplained.

While my month is filled with writing projects — including two new releases, some short stories in progress, and making revisions to Without Condition — I’m still reading every day. I have a few dark novels on my “To Read” list, including Destroyer by Victor LaValle and Give Me Your Hand by Megan Abbott. If you have any recommendations for me, please leave them in the comments!

I also have a few recommendations for you, if you are looking for something new to read this October.

I recently finished Breathe, Breathe by Erin Sweet Al-Mehairi. It is a short collection of dark poetry and short stories. The short stories were good overall — my favorite was “The Madness of the Woodpecker” — but I was most impressed by the poetry. I have a hard time engaging with collections of poetry because I read too quickly to really absorb the meaning of the verse (my fault, not the fault of any poem or poet). Al-Mehairi’s poems stuck with me and chilled me as I read them. Some tell stories, others describe chaotic emotions, but all are terrifying.

I also recommend Sacrificial Lambs and Others by Sheri White. The collection contains several flash pieces as well as longer short stories. Flash fiction, like poetry, also has a hard time sticking with me because of how fast I read. White’s stories still find themselves in my head, though, even though I read the collection months ago. My personal favorites were “Ashes to Ashes” and “First Day of School.”

You may remember that last month, I interviewed author Loren Rhoads. I was excited to read her memoir, Wish You Were Here: Adventures in Cemetery Travel. I’ve now read it, and I highly recommend it if you’d like to read some macabre nonfiction — namely, if you’re interested in travel essays (I want to note that Rhoads did not ask me to review the book as part of our interview — I purchased the book, read it, and am now reviewing it all on my own accord). Her writing gives the reader a wonderful sense of place in cemeteries around the globe. I’ve now added several new destinations to my list, including Bela Lugosi’s grave and the skeleton-filled catacombs of Paris.

I hope you find some excellent eerie reads for October — and, I hope you’ll consider adding both Wither and Other Stories and Quoth the Raven to your reading list!

Two (!) New Releases Next Week

Happy October, everyone! The second week is a busy one on my end, but in an awesome way. I’ll have two books — one a collection of my own, and one an anthology I’m included in — available to purchase next week.

The first is the anthology: Quoth the Raven, a collection of contemporary re-imaginings of the works of Edgar Allan Poe, from Camden Park Press. My story, “Hearts are Just ‘Likes,'” is one of many stories and poems to appear in the collection, which is edited by Lyn Worthen. It’s a modern take on “The Tell-Tale Heart,” one of my favorite Poe stories. The anthology is available for pre-order now, and will be available on October 7, 2018.

quoth the raven
From Camden Park Press

Pre-order Quoth the Raven: Kindle | Paperback (Amazon)
Nook | Other ebook outlets

The second is my next short story collection, Wither and Other Stories. It will feature four new stories: “Wither,” “Nesting,” “Smoke Circles,” and “We Really Shouldn’t.” It will be available in ebook and paperback on October 9, 2018.

wither and other stories
Cover Art by Doug Puller.

Read more about “Wither and Other Stories.”

I hope you enjoy these stories. Both books will be excellent, fast reads for the Halloween season.

I also have a few other projects in the works, which I’ll share more about in the coming weeks.

“The Crow’s Gift” Turns 1!

One year ago today, I published my short story collection, The Crow’s Gift and Other Tales!

the crow's gift
Art by Doug Puller

The Crow’s Gift contains many firsts. It holds “All the Pieces Coming Together,” the first short story I wrote when I got back into writing seriously. It was the first time I collaborated with Doug Puller, who designed the cover and formatted the book; and the first time I worked with Evelyn Duffy, who edited the collection. It was the first book I put together, as well as my first short story collection. It was also my first venture into self-publishing.

That final first (an oxymoron if there ever was one) was probably the most nerve-wracking. I’d only ever shared my work amongst a few friends, a couple family members, and teachers. I’d never put something out into the world that was out of my hands when it came to who would buy it and read it.

It’s been a great experience. I’ve loved seeing people’s responses to the stories in the collection — especially when friends and family send me pictures of, and tweets about, crows. I’ve also gotten less nervous about collecting my work and putting it out there (just less nervous, though — not free of nerves). And, I’ve stayed inspired to keep writing more.

Thanks to everyone who’s purchased and read the collection, and who’s shared it with their friends. Your support means the world to me.

If you’d like to buy The Crow’s Gift and Other Tales, it’s available on Amazon for Kindle and in paperback.

If you’ve read the collection, please be sure to review it on Amazon.

And if you want more short stories, my next collection, Wither and Other Stories, will be out on October 9, 2018.

Cover: Wither and Other Stories

This fall, I’ll be releasing another small collection of short stories called Wither and Other Stories. While I have some finishing touches to do on the collection itself, I’m thrilled to be able to share the cover with all of you:

Wither and Other Stories
Art by Doug Puller.

The cover features excellent artwork from my frequent collaborator and friend, Doug Puller. He is hard at work illustrating Volume 1 of Wretched Heroes, the graphic novel which I co-wrote with him; and I’m glad he had time to bring his talents to this collection.

The collection will be available in ebook and paperback form. Below is the full cover that will appear on the paperback, minus the description and author bio (two of the pieces that need finishing touches):

Wither and Other Stories
Art by Doug Puller

I anticipate publishing this collection in October, just in time for Halloween. It will feature four short stories: Wither, Nesting, Smoke Circles, and We Really Shouldn’t. It will also have the first chapter of my next book as a bonus. I can’t wait to share all of them with you this fall.

If you just can’t wait that long, I do have another collection of short stories available now: The Crow’s Gift and Other Tales, available in ebook and paperback form. If you’ve already purchased or read it, I’d appreciate it if you left an honest review on Amazon — or, if you’d rather write a review on your own blog or website, please send me a link. I’d love to hear your thoughts!

Finally, please add Wither and Other Stories to your shelves on Goodreads if you’d like to read it.